Pediatric Health Centers

Healthy Relationship Workshops!

 

This year Both The New Roberto Clemente Middle School and The Napier Academy took part in the ……….

TeenEqualityWheel2 “Healthy Relationship” Workshop!  On March 17th the 7th grade students at the New Roberto Clemente School and again on April 21st  63  8th grader students at the Napier Academy participated in these workshops .  At both events the Full Service Community School Health Centers’ Behavioral Health Team provided psychoeducation on identifying characteristics of healthy and unhealthy interpersonal relationships.

“The Full Service Community Schools envisions a school environment where all students engage in healthy behaviors in their social settings with family, peers, teachers, and other adults across their life course development.” Melissa Elliott, LCSW, Director of the Behavioral Health Program at the FSCS Health Center and MSW Internship Team!

The goal of this workshop was to inspire and seek ways to help reduce the prevalence of dysfunctional, abusive and violent relationships among adolescents through visual tools and interaction.

Melissa  wishes to begin these workshops (Hygiene, Mindfulness, and Healthy Relationships in early fall in all the Full Service Community Schools since they have been so positively appreciated by students and staff. A huge “thank you” to Melissa and her team!

 

 

February Heart Health Month

Since February is the month of the Heart….our Hearts… I thought it appropriate to share with you this beautifully written excerpt from “Staying Healthy with Nutrition” by E. M. Haas, M. D. Enjoy!                                               Denise Hajjar                        cool-cute-hand-hands-heart-Favim.com-220925 (1)

                         

                                                Vitamin L (the love vitamin) is commonly known as the “universal” or the “love” vitamin, as coined by humanologist, Bethany ArgIsle. One of the most important nutrients for optimum health is a daily dose (or more) of Love. The vital human emotion/expression/experience is necessary for the optimal functioning of people and all of their cells, tissues, and organs. It is found in most of nature – in foods, domestic animals, friends, and family – and is used to heal a wide variety of diseases. There are no toxic effects, but deficiency can cause a wide range of ailments.

Sources: As stated, vitamin L is found in a great variety of sources but must be developed and nurtured to be available. Fear, anger, worry, self-concern, and many other human emotions can destroy vitamin L. It is found readily in most mums and dads and is very highly concentrated in grandmothers and grandpas. Sisters and brothers may be a good source of vitamin L, though often this is covered up in early years, develops in the teens, and is more available in adulthood. Massage therapy is a particularly good source of vitamin L.

Vitamin L is also found in cats, dogs, and horses; in flowers and birds; and in trees and plants. In food, it is especially found in home-cooked or other meals where vitamin L is used consciously as an ingredient. It is digested and absorbed easily and used by the body in its pure state, being eliminated almost unchanged; in this, it is unique among the vitamins. It is also made by friendly bacteria and all positive reactions and attitudes in the body.

Functions: This vitamin acts as the “universal” vitalising energy. Vitamin L helps to catalyze all human functions and is particularly important to heart function and the circulation of warmth and joy. Digestion is very dependent on appropriate doses of Vitamin L, as is the function of the nervous system. Adrenalin, the brain endorphins (natural tranquillisers and energisers) and other hormones are enhanced by Vitamin L as well. A wide variety of other bodily and life functions are dependent on vitamin L, and it is extremely important to the healing process.

Deficiency and toxicity: There are rarely any serious problems from excess intake of vitamin L. Side effects, however, may include swooning, a strange feeling in the centre of the chest, goosebumps, and staring blankly into space.

Simple ways to Prepare you Body for Test Taking

Screen Shot 2015-12-02 at 1.17.23 PM

Smelly Feet? We can help

Smelly Feet

Image Source: Personal.PSU.edu

Ever wonder why feet are so stinky?  We wanted to share this very interesting and helpful article first posted on kidshealth.org.  We hope you enjoy it and would love to know your comments.

Un Salud,

The Health Clinic Team

 

Why Do Feet Stink?

They’re your tootsies, your dogs, your piggies. Whatever you call them, feet are an important part of you. Without them, you couldn’t stand up, walk around, or run a race. In fact, your feet work so hard for you that sometimes they get sweaty. And stinky.

Think of a hot, summer day when you’ve been walking around an amusement park all afternoon. Oooh, boy — your feet have been in those sneakers a long time! On the car ride home, you decide to kick off your shoes. It feels good, but it smells bad. In fact, you might get an earful from the other passengers in the car: P.U. — what stinks?

Bacteria are to blame. These tiny critters normally inhabit your feet and love dark, damp places like the insides of sweaty shoes. They multiply in sweat, so if you don’t wear socks, that really gets them going.

In the right conditions, bacteria will feast on your feet. These bacteria eat dead skin cells and oils from your skin. Their colonies will grow and start getting rid of waste in the form of organic acids. It’s those organic acids that smell bad.

And for 10% to 15% of people, the smell is really bad. Why? Because their feet are extra sweaty and become home to bacteria called Kyetococcus sedentarius (say: kite-oh-KAH-kus SEH-den-tair-ee-us). These bacteria produce more than just stinky organic acids — they also produce stuff called volatile sulfur compounds. Sulfur compounds usually are powerful and awful smelling. If you’ve ever smelled a rotten egg, you know what volatile sulfur compounds smell like.

What Can You Do?

There’s usually no need to worry about stinky feet. But if the stink bothers you or someone notices it, you may want help to step in.

So how can you stop your feet from stinking? Well, you might not be able to stop stink completely. But if you cut down on sweat, you’ll cut down on the odor.

Try these steps:

  • Be clean. Wash your feet every day. Dipping your feet into a tub of water and scrubbing may be better than just letting the shower water splash on them. Be sure to dry your feet when you’re done.
  • Wear the right socks. Cotton, some wools, and special knits made for athletes will absorb sweat and allow your feet to breathe. Put on a fresh pair every day, and also if the socks get damp.
  • Make sure your shoes aren’t too tight. If they are, your feet might sweat more than normal.
  • Switch shoes. Wearing the same shoes every day can make them smellier. Let them dry out for a couple of days before wearing them again.
  • Kill those germs. Ask your mom or dad about using a disinfectant spray to kill bacteria in your shoes. You also might wash your feet with antibacterial soap. Setting shoes out in the sun also may help.
  • Wash shoes or insoles. Some insoles or shoes, especially sneakers, may be washable — a great way to kill odors and get clean-smelling shoes again. Be sure to dry them completely before wearing them.
  • Avoid shoes made of plastic. Plastic and some human-made materials don’t let your feet breathe.
  • Go barefoot. Let your feet air out by letting them spend some time in the open air, especially at night. But don’t go barefoot too much — especially in the outdoors — because that can invite certain bacteria (like that Kyetococcus) to live on your feet!
  • Don’t share shoes or towels with others. If you do, that may transfer stink-causing bacteria from other people’s feet to yours. Gross!

If you still have problems with foot odor, talk with your mom or dad to get their opinion. If they agree think the stink is a concern, they can try getting you odor-fighting powder or insoles. If nothing seems to work, you might want to talk with your doctor about what to do. The doctor may give you a special medicine to put on your feet.

For most people, foot odor can be controlled. The worst part about having stinky feet is that it’s embarrassing. If you’re worried about this, just keep your shoes on when you’re in social situations, like when you’re at school or riding in a car.

At home, keep your feet clean and go barefoot so they get some air. If your feet are clean and dry, those bacteria will have to find their lunch somewhere else!

Reviewed by: George Preti, PhD
Date reviewed: October 2014

Source: http://kidshealth.org/kid/talk/yucky/feet_stink.html#

Cold & Flu Season is Here: Be Prepared!

Flu 1

Everyday Preventive Actions That Can Help Fight Germs, like The Flu

The Center for Disease Control (or CDC) recommends a three-step approach to fighting influenza ( commonly known as The Flu). The first and most important step is to get a flu vaccination each year. But if you get the flu, there are prescription antiviral drugs that can treat your illness. Early treatment is especially important for the elderly, the very young, people with certain chronic health conditions, and pregnant women. Finally, everyday preventive actions may slow the spread of germs that cause respiratory (nose, throat, and lungs) illnesses, like flu.

 

flu

How does the flu spread?

Flu viruses are thought to spread mainly from person to person through droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze, or talk. Flu viruses also may spread when people touch something with flu virus on it and then touch their mouth, eyes, or nose. Many other viruses spread these ways too. People infected with flu may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5-7 days after becoming sick. That means you may be able to spread the flu to someone else before you know you are sick as well as while you are sick. Young children, those who are severely ill, and those who have severely weakened immune systems may be able to infect others for longer than 5-7 days.Person washing hands

 

What are everyday preventive actions?

• Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

• If you or your child gets sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you (or your child) stay home for at least 24 hours after the fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. The fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine. • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.

• Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol- based hand rub. • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.

• Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.

• If an outbreak of flu or another illness occurs, follow public health advice. This may include information about how to increase distance between people and other measures. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases What additional steps can I take at work to help stop the spread of germs that can cause respiratory illness, like flu?Man sneezing into a tissue

• Find out about your employer’s plans if an outbreak of flu or another illness occurs and whether flu vaccinations are offered on-site.

• Routinely clean frequently touched objects and surfaces, including doorknobs, keyboards, and phones, to help remove germs.

• Make sure your workplace has an adequate supply of tissues, soap, paper towels, alcohol-based hand rubs, and disposable wipes.

• Train others on how to do your job so they can cover for you in case you or a family member gets sick and you have to stay home.

• If you begin to feel sick while at work, go home as soon as possible.Mother taking care of sick child What additional preventive actions can I take to protect my child from germs that can cause respiratory illness, like flu?

• Find out about plans your child’s school, child care program, or college has if an outbreak of flu or another illness occurs and whether flu vaccinations are offered on-site.

• Make sure your child’s school, child care program, or college routinely cleans frequently touched objects and surfaces, and that they have a good supply of tissues, soap, paper towels, alcohol-based hand rubs, and disposable wipes on-site.

• Ask how sick students and staff are separated from others and who will care for them until they can go home. Everyday preventive actions can help slow the spread of germs that can cause many different illnesses and may offer some protection against the flu.

For more information, visit http://www.cdc.gov, or call 1-800-CDC-INFO.

Source: Parent Flu information

FSCS Health Center Activity

We welcomed the dentist at School 6 this week and had a blast at the ADHD fair at school 5!

photo 1

photo 2

photo 3

Kid Chef, Healthy Treats for November

Turkey Toast with Pumpkin Butter

Makes one toast turkey large enough to feed  two to three small children.

3 pieces of bread, buttered and toasted

2 heaping Tablespoons canned pumpkin puree

1 heaping Tablespoon peanut butter (or almond butter or any kind of butter you prefer)

1 t. brown sugar

1 T. pure maple syrup

Pinch salt

½ t. cinnamon

¼ t. ginger

Assorted toppings, about ¼ cup each in small bowls (or little piles on a big plate)  coconut, chopped nuts, edible seeds of any kind, chocolate chips, dried fruit such as cranberries, raisins or cherries.

Instructions:

Butter & toast the bread (preferably just toast the top by broiling it as it cuts a little easier).

Leave one piece of the bread whole, then cut one piece like this:

Cut the next piece like this:

Mix the next 7 ingredients until smooth with a fork in a small bowl.  Spread the pumpkin-spice peanut butter on the toast and assemble the turkey.

Let the kids decorate the turkey’s toast “feathers” with the various toppings, then dive in and eat!

You can also make three pumpkins, by turning the toast upside down, then cutting the corners of the toast – rounding them a bit and leaving a fat stem, like so:

SOURCE:

This was printed from: We Laugh, We Cry, We Cook
The site URL: http://welaughwecrywecook.com
The Title: Gobble-Gobble Turkey Toast with Pumpkin Butter
The URL: http://wp.me/p1UwM9-JW
© Copyright 2012 – All Rights Reserved