Pediatric Health Centers

Author Archives: Health n Wellness

By Maria Lopez, Nutrition Educator

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 4 easy steps to promote breast health              

If you are concerned about developing breast cancer, you might be wondering if there are steps you can take to minimize the risk. Some factors, such as family history, can’t be changed. However, there are lifestyle changes you can make to lower your risk. 

 

Step 1: Do self-examinations regularly

Step 2: Maintain a healthy weight.

Step 3: Be physically active.

  • Most healthy adults should aim for at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity weekly.
  • National Cancer Institute recommends: 4+ hours/week may help to decrease hormone levels and help lower breast cancer risk.

 

Step 4: Eat a Healthy diet & choose whole grains, legumes, and about 6-9 servings of a variety of colorful fruits & veggies.

  • 1 serving =
  • 1 cup leafy greens
  • ½ cup raw chopped veggies
  • ½ cup fruit (size of tennis balls)                                                  Heartshape fruits and vegetables
  • 6 oz 100% fruit juice or vegetable juice
  • ¼ cup dried fruit

Unfortunately, there are also a number of important breast cancer risk factors that women have no control over. Knowing which ones apply to you can help you understand your risk and do what you can to lower it. If you feel you’re at high risk, talk to a doctor or other health professional. These can increase a woman’s breast cancer risk:

  • Older age, especially 60 years or over
  • Family history of breast cancer
  • First menstrual period before age 12
  • Menopause at age 55 or over
  • First childbirth after age 35
  • No children
  • Tall height (5’8” or taller)
  • Dense breasts
  • History of benign breast disease (like atypical hyperplasia)

HERE ARE SOME PHOTOS OF OUR BREAST CANCER AWARENESS WORKSHOPS  AT OUR COMMUNITY SCHOOL HEALTH CENTERS! PARENTS AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS PARTICIPATED IN THESE INFORMATIVE TALKS!

Breast Cancer Awareness Events! (2)

 


Did you know that breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women of all race and ethnicities worldwide? As a way to support women, raise awareness and educate the community about breast cancer, FSCS Health Centers will be offering free educational workshops for parents and guardians focusing on the signs, symptoms, treatments and prevention methods for this disease. Please see schedule below:

 

Date School Time
10/16 School #15 8:30 am
10/17 John F. Kennedy Educational Complex 11:00 am
10/23 School #5 8:30 am
10/29 School #6 2:00 pm
10/30 School #4 5:00 pm

 

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Photo by Miguel Á. Padriñán on Pexels.com

 

Date School Time
10/16 School #15 8:30 am
10/17 John F. Kennedy Educational Complex 11:00 am
10/23 School #5 8:30 am
10/29 School #6 2:00 pm
10/30 School #4 8:00 am

 


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Photo by Nubia Navarro (nubikini) on Pexels.com

Dear Parents/Guardians,

It has been our sincere pleasure to work with your family in providing Health Care Services this school year. We overwhelming appreciate your confidence and warmly recognize your support as we strive to make sure that each and every student has the brightest future and utmost success.

I recently received a card and on the back was this beautiful saying brought to us by Papyrus cards:

“LEGENDS SAY THAT HUMMINGBIRDS FLOAT FREE OF TIME, CARRYING OUR HOPES FOR LOVE, JOY AND CELEBRATION.  HUMMINGBIRDS OPEN OUR EYES TO THE WONDER OF THE WORLD AND INSPIRE US TO OPEN OUR HEARS TO LOVED ONES AND FRIENDS. LIKE A HUMMINGBIRD, WE ASPIRE TO HOVER AND TO SAVOR EACH MOMENT AS IT PASSES, EMBRACE ALL THAT LIFE HAS TO OFFER AND TO CELEBRATE THE JOY OF EVERYDAY. THE HUMMINGBIRD’S DELICATE GRACE REMINDS US THAT LIFE IS RICH, BEAUTY IS EVERYWHERE, EVERY PERSONAL CONNECTION HAS MEANING AND THAT LAUGHTER IS LIFES SWEETEST CREATION.”

We wish you a happy, healthy and safe summer!


What better way to start summer than a visit from a published author and illustrator! Author, Rod Gonzalez, took time from his busy schedule to read to our students in grades 1st through 3rd and follow up with  lively discussions on Pirates! Thanks so very much, Mr. Gonzalez for your coming to School 2, the Napier Academy,  and Senator Frank Lautenberg!

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Special Thanks to :(AuDSLP) AUDIOLOGY AND SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY DIAGNOSTIC AND REHABILITATION CLINIC for providing screenings to our students during the month of March at: School 2, School 5, Napier Academy, Senator Frank Lautenberg and School 15! Thousands of students were screened.  We applaud your team and we are grateful!


Ribbon cutting for School 2 becoming a Full Service Community School as Health N Wellness Services partner with the Board of Education and Oasis, A haven for Women and Children! Welcome to the ‘Eagles nest!’

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By Taylor Weber, Montclair State University Intern

Heartshape fruits and vegetables                                         February is American Heart Month, and even though it’s almost over, there is still time to show your heart a little extra love this month! No matter your age or gender, taking time to stop and make smart decisions now will help to support a lifetime of health.  A tip that will make your heart smile is to reduce your sodium intake! On average, Americans eat close to 3500 mg of sodium a day, while the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends 2300 mg of sodium daily and to go along with this, our country has a major heart disease problem. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death and about 75 million Americans have been diagnosed with high blood pressure!

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You may be asking yourself, “How am I going to decrease my salt intake?” Well, it’s easy — just follow these steps and you’ll be enjoying flavorful meals that your heart will love!

Cut down on the processed foods – These foods are just jam packed with salt that are not doing any good for our health. Try eating whole, fresh foods because not only do they taste good, they are much more filling to help keep you full longer.

  1. Substitute with herbs and spices — Try cooking with cumin, cayenne, paprika, black pepper, oregano, garlic or onion powder to offer a nice flavorful bite just like salt does.
  2. Use low sodium condiments – When you are reading food labels, look for condiments with sodium around 140 mg of sodium per serving.

Try adding citrus juice — Adding the juice from fresh lemons, limes, oranges or grapefruits are an excellent way to flavor your food without salt.

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The Full Service Community School Health Center is proud to partner with William Paterson University  to implement Bilingual Cultural Adjustment Groups:

Description of the Program

The Culture Adjustment and Reliance (CAR) research team at the Department of Psychology, William Paterson University developed a 10-week, school-based, culturally-responsive group for recent immigrant students. The goals of the group include (a) helping immigrant students build peer connection and social support to ameliorate the stress of migration and cultural adjustment process; (b) addressing students’ family, peer, and school experience as they navigate the new cultural context; and (c) promoting a positive sense of self and learn positive coping strategies. This program is currently implemented at middle schools in Paterson, NJ for Spanish and Bangladeshi immigrant students, and facilitated by bilingual master’s and doctoral students studying in Clinical and Counseling Psychology.

Principle Investigators:

  • Pei-Wen Winnie Ma, Ph.D.

Dr Ma (1)

Dr. Ma is an Associate Professor of Psychology and the Director of Master’s program in Clinical and Counseling Psychology at William Paterson University of New Jersey. She is a licensed psychologist in the state of New York and has over a decade of clinical experience working with Asian immigrant clients and supervising pre-doctoral interns at Hamilton-Madison House in New York City. Her research investigates parent-child relationship, career development and treatment of mental health concerns from a cultural and relational framework. She received her Ph.D. degree in Counseling Psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University.

 

  • Aileen Torres, Ph.D.

Dr Torres (1)

Dr. Torres is a licensed clinical psychologist in NJ and Puerto Rico with clinical experiences focused on abuse and trauma, family therapy, parenting and cultural adaptation. She is currently an assistant professor at William Paterson University of NJ’s Clinical PsyD program. She was the Associate Director of Clinical Services and Internship Director at the YCS Institute for Infant and Preschool Mental Health from 2011-2017 and is endorsed as a Level IV Clinical Mentor by the NJ Association for Infant Mental Health. She had experience in child abuse forensic evaluations and treatment services at the Regional Diagnostic Treatment Center (RDTC) at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center from 2007-2011.  In 2011 she served on the Advisory Group on Child Abuse and Neglect Mental Health Evaluation for the NJ Department of Children and Families. Her private practice is located in Lyndhurst, NJ where she conducts forensic psychological evaluations for immigration cases (extreme hardship, asylum, VAWA, etc.).  She is the Past-President of the Latino/a Psychological Association of NJ (LPANJ), member of the National Latinx Psychological Association and currently on the New Jersey Psychological Association’s Committee on Diversity and Inclusion (NJPA CODI). Her research interests include bicultural identity integration and dissonant acculturation in families, as well as cultural protective factors in child abuse cases.


From our Full Service Community School Health Center staff, counselors and interns! Hope you have a joyous holiday season….

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