Pediatric Health Centers

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The Full Service Community School Health Center is proud to partner with William Paterson University  to implement Bilingual Cultural Adjustment Groups:

Description of the Program

The Culture Adjustment and Reliance (CAR) research team at the Department of Psychology, William Paterson University developed a 10-week, school-based, culturally-responsive group for recent immigrant students. The goals of the group include (a) helping immigrant students build peer connection and social support to ameliorate the stress of migration and cultural adjustment process; (b) addressing students’ family, peer, and school experience as they navigate the new cultural context; and (c) promoting a positive sense of self and learn positive coping strategies. This program is currently implemented at middle schools in Paterson, NJ for Spanish and Bangladeshi immigrant students, and facilitated by bilingual master’s and doctoral students studying in Clinical and Counseling Psychology.

Principle Investigators:

  • Pei-Wen Winnie Ma, Ph.D.

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Dr. Ma is an Associate Professor of Psychology and the Director of Master’s program in Clinical and Counseling Psychology at William Paterson University of New Jersey. She is a licensed psychologist in the state of New York and has over a decade of clinical experience working with Asian immigrant clients and supervising pre-doctoral interns at Hamilton-Madison House in New York City. Her research investigates parent-child relationship, career development and treatment of mental health concerns from a cultural and relational framework. She received her Ph.D. degree in Counseling Psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University.

 

  • Aileen Torres, Ph.D.

Dr Torres (1)

Dr. Torres is a licensed clinical psychologist in NJ and Puerto Rico with clinical experiences focused on abuse and trauma, family therapy, parenting and cultural adaptation. She is currently an assistant professor at William Paterson University of NJ’s Clinical PsyD program. She was the Associate Director of Clinical Services and Internship Director at the YCS Institute for Infant and Preschool Mental Health from 2011-2017 and is endorsed as a Level IV Clinical Mentor by the NJ Association for Infant Mental Health. She had experience in child abuse forensic evaluations and treatment services at the Regional Diagnostic Treatment Center (RDTC) at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center from 2007-2011.  In 2011 she served on the Advisory Group on Child Abuse and Neglect Mental Health Evaluation for the NJ Department of Children and Families. Her private practice is located in Lyndhurst, NJ where she conducts forensic psychological evaluations for immigration cases (extreme hardship, asylum, VAWA, etc.).  She is the Past-President of the Latino/a Psychological Association of NJ (LPANJ), member of the National Latinx Psychological Association and currently on the New Jersey Psychological Association’s Committee on Diversity and Inclusion (NJPA CODI). Her research interests include bicultural identity integration and dissonant acculturation in families, as well as cultural protective factors in child abuse cases.

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From our Full Service Community School Health Center staff, counselors and interns! Hope you have a joyous holiday season….

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Turkey Toast with Pumpkin Butter

Makes one toast turkey large enough to feed  two to three small children.

3 pieces of bread, buttered and toasted

2 heaping Tablespoons canned pumpkin puree

1 heaping Tablespoon peanut butter (or almond butter or any kind of butter you prefer)

1 t. brown sugar

1 T. pure maple syrup

Pinch salt

½ t. cinnamon

¼ t. ginger

Assorted toppings, about ¼ cup each in small bowls (or little piles on a big plate)  coconut, chopped nuts, edible seeds of any kind, chocolate chips, dried fruit such as cranberries, raisins or cherries.

Instructions:

Butter & toast the bread (preferably just toast the top by broiling it as it cuts a little easier).

Leave one piece of the bread whole, then cut one piece like this:

Cut the next piece like this:

Mix the next 7 ingredients until smooth with a fork in a small bowl.  Spread the pumpkin-spice peanut butter on the toast and assemble the turkey.

Let the kids decorate the turkey’s toast “feathers” with the various toppings, then dive in and eat!

You can also make three pumpkins, by turning the toast upside down, then cutting the corners of the toast – rounding them a bit and leaving a fat stem, like so:

SOURCE:

This was printed from: We Laugh, We Cry, We Cook
The site URL: http://welaughwecrywecook.com
The Title: Gobble-Gobble Turkey Toast with Pumpkin Butter
The URL: http://wp.me/p1UwM9-JW
© Copyright 2012 – All Rights Reserved


FSCS HEALTH CENTER

November is National American Diabetes Awareness Month.  It is a topic that we hold dear to our hearts here at the Health Center.  What is diabetes, you may ask?  There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2.  Type 1 Diabetes is when the body can no longer make any insulin. Insulin is a hormone your body needs to use glucose. Glucose is a sugar your body uses to give you energy. This is why people with type 1 diabetes need to inject insulin every day in order to live. Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented.  Type 2 Diabetes is when the body can make insulin; however, it may not make enough, the insulin may not work well, or both.  Type 2 diabetes may be prevented or delayed for many years.

Every year we see more and more of our students being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.  Type 2 diabetes is caused by unhealthy diet and being overweight.  It is a disease that is preventable with proper diet and exercise and we strive to make nutrition education a priority for the families at our schools.  If you are part of the health clinic and are interested in receiving guidance and support, we are here for you to help with meal planning, counseling, and much more.  Simply contact the treatment coordinator at your school’s health center.

You can find additional information and advice on the Diabetes Awareness website: www.diabetes.org.  Here we have included some important information to review if you feel that you or a family member may be at risk.

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes in Children

Children and teens may be able to prevent diabetes or delay its onset for many years. Small changes can make a big difference. Even a small amount of weight loss can help prevent or delay diabetes.

Losing weight is hard, especially if you’re trying to do it by yourself. Get the whole family involved. After all, a healthy diet for preventing diabetes is a healthy diet for everyone.

Lose Weight By Eating Healthy

Here are some healthy eating tips the whole family can try.

Drink water — Limit sugar-sweetened drinks including, sodas, juices, sports drinks, and coffee drinks. These drinks add calories with little or no nutritional value.

Eat more fruits and vegetables — If fresh is not available, try frozen or canned fruits (in natural juice, not syrup) and vegetables. They’re more affordable, easy to cook and they don’t go bad!

Make healthy snack foods easy to find in the kitchen — Place grapes, carrots or plain popcorn on the counter.

Limit fast food — When you do choose fast food, make healthier choices:

  • Choose salads with dressing on the side
  • Choose foods that are grilled or broiled
  • Choose diet sodas or low-fat milk to drink
  • Hold the mayo
  • Choose baked chips or apple slices instead of French fries.
  • Order the kid-size meal

Learn how to Create Your Plate — Fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables. For the remaining side, fill half with a lean protein, and the remaining quarter with carbs or starches, like brown rice or whole grain pasta.

Lose Weight By Getting Active

Limit sitting in front of a screen time to no more than 2 hours a day — This includes TV, computer, phone and video games.

Get moving — Children and teens should get 60 minutes a day of exercise most days of the week. Here are ways your family can be more physically active:

  • Walk, bike, or scooter to school. Try a “walking school bus” or supervised bike rides.
  • Turn up the music and dance
  • Walk outside, in a mall, at a park, or in a museum
  • Join your local YMCA
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator
  • Get off the bus a stop early and walk
  • Park at the far end of the lot
  • Play interactive video games that get you up and moving
  • Walk around while talking on the phone or watching TV

Set Goals — Challenge your child, and yourself by setting small goals. Reward your successes with non-food items. (Ex. Having a sleepover, renting a movie, going shopping)

Get more tips on setting goalshealthy eating and staying active.

Warning Signs

Children and teens with type 2 diabetes often feel no symptoms at all. However, be aware of some common symptoms of type 2 diabetes.

Increased thirst

Frequent or nighttime urination

Blurry vision

Unusual fatigue

If you notice any of these symptoms in your child, contact a healthcare provider.

To learn more, call us at 1-800-DIABETES (342-2383) or email AskADA@diabetes.org.

 


Thank You to the Susan G. Komen Foundation for the following information!

Breast Cancer Awareness-Healthy Living Tri-Fold_09-2015 FINAL

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All our Full Service Community School Health Centers gave “Breast Cancer Awareness Workshops”….here are some of the photos!

School 15! Shalika  took it outside!!!

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Frank Lautenberg School! Ms. Diane…IMG_4914.jpg

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FSCS Food Allergies

Does your child suffer from allergies?  If so, we have some good news for you!  There is a wonderful movement happening called the Teal Pumpkin project.  The movement was created by the Food Allergy Research and Education organization (FARE).  Their mission is to create a safer and happier Halloween for all kids.

Creating a safer Halloween for all kids.

Creating a safer Halloween for all kids.

To learn more about the Teal Pumpkin Project, you can visit their website at https://www.foodallergy.org/education-awareness/teal-pumpkin-project.

On the website, you will find wonderful resources including ideas for non-food treats along with information on how you can participate.  Together we can assure that all children are able to enjoy a safe and FUN Halloween this year!


FSCS Halloween

Having raised four children, believe me when I say that Halloween stirs up a whole bunch of emotions.  While we absolutely love to see our little nuggets prancing around in their favorite costumes, the days before are filled with stress; sowing and trying on customs, searching for creative odds and ends, or standing on long lines exchanging last minute costumes…hmmm not so much.  So as we wait for this deliciously ghoulish holiday to begin, here are some healthy alternatives to the day’s activities:

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If you do have some time to whip up a healthy pizza before, during or after trick or treating try:

 Pizza dough

Mozzarella Cheese

5 large ripe tomatoes peeled or 1 large can of peeled plum tomatoes

1 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil, first cold press

1 tablespoon of basil

1teaspoon of oregano

sea salt

First, preheat oven to 425. Mix tomatoes, basil, oregano, and a few sprinkles of sea salt and 1 tablespoon of the oil in a blender until puree into a sauce.  Arrange on dough and pop in the oven for about 10 minutes on 425.  In meantime, use a ghost cookie cutter and cut out ghost shapes of mozzarella cheese add a green pepper slice or carrot slice for a top hat…ok some ghosts wear hats, right?  Pop in the oven until shapes start to resemble a ghost about 5 minutes…. take out of the oven an cut some olives for eyes; could be green olives or black olives.

Tomatoes are rich in lycopene, lutein and scientist believe this rich mixture of phytochemicals fight disease as well as serve up a good portion of anti-cancer benefits– not to mention they are an excellent source for healthy eyes. Oregano is about one of the healthiest herbs you can serve your family. It contains vitamins A, B6, K and C as well as minerals such calcium and potassium. Oregano is a great digestive aid.  Keep in mind that adding a few drops of oregano oil in your favorite juice each morning helps to boost your immune system.  Basil also contains vitamin A and K and they don’t call it Holy Basil for nothing.  Ayurvedic medicine has been remedying with basil for thousands of years.  It too helps to fight infections and works well to help clear acne due to its anti-inflammatory capabilities and of course, vitamin A, helps to cleanse infected skin, cells.

For dessert, a special treat:  Carve a mini orange jack o lantern…scoop out the orange “guts” and refill with some organic orange sherbet…great fun is watching the sherbet drip through the eyes and mouth!  Oranges are very high in vitamin C and quercetin and there is much press regarding oranges’ health benefit in reducing the onset of asthma.

If you are really into this festive holiday, and of course wish to not sleep the night before…. boil eggs, peel and add a ghost face with an edible black marker.  Eggs are an awesome start to a school day; the protein keeps your child full longer and focused on schoolwork.

 Finally, a few ideas for Filling those Trick-O-Treat bags:

Cereal bars

Granola bars

Rice crispy treats

Fake teeth

Fake eyeballs

Spider or glowing rings

Halloween pencils (unsharpened)

Crazy Halloween erasers

Glowing rubber bracelets

Finally a treat for mom! Don’t know what to do with that leftover, carved pumpkin?

Make a promise to yourself after all the day’s activities and the kids are soundly asleep.  Go to the bathroom…lock the door and relax with a good lavender soak and apply:

To create a face mask of oatmeal and shredded pumpkin and add a few drops of fish oil and relax with a face mask for about 10 minutes.

1 and ½ tablespoons of shredded pumpkin

1 teaspoon of oatmeal (old-fashion)

1 teaspoon of fish oil or if you cringe at the thought of the smell, you can use coconut oil.  While the fish oil will help to rebound elasticity to help with wrinkles, coconut oil is a great rejuvenator and skin softener.  In fact, put some on your lips to help soothe and keep them moist during sleep.

The pumpkin is high in beta-carotene and aids in washing away dead skin cells, oatmeal helps to clean and calm the skin.

Rinse and follow with a good night cream of

1 tablespoon of Greek yogurt mixed with 1 teaspoon of cocoa butter or honey

This will both soften and smooth out wrinkles!

Happy Halloween!

 

Denise Hajjar, MS,

Holistic Nutrition Educator

Questions? Email Denise at denisehealthnwellness@gmail.com