Pediatric Health Centers

Category Archives: Uncategorized

Welcome back to all students, FSCS Health Center

We are thrilled to welcome back our wonderful students to all of the Full Service Community School Health Centers (FSCS) in participating schools.  We know this is going to be a wonderful and healthy year for all children!

If you have been wondering what the FSCS Health Center is, we would love to share a little bit about ourselves:

The FSCS Health Center is The Board of Education’s Comprehensive School-Based Health Clinics.  We operate pediatric Health Centers that provide children access to quality care inside the school.  At all FSCS Health Centers your children can receive the following care:

  • Pediatric Doctor scheduled appointments for sick and well-care preventative services
  • Dental Care
  • Vision Care Both screening, exam, and eyeglasses
  • Nutrition Education and parents/guardians workshops
  • Behavioral Health Counseling and Social Work Support for students and families
  • Audiology screenings

In order to utilize our services, you must first enroll with your school’s Health Center.  Below is a list of the participating schools:

Paterson, School 5: Contact Nargish Akther at 973-321-2273

Paterson, NRC: Contact Maryln Grullon   at 973-321-1000 Ext. 22489

Paterson, Frank Lautenberg : Contact  Diane Savage  at 973-321-1000 Ext: 20648

Paterson, School 15: Contact Shalika Ulloa  at 973-321-1000 Ext. 10155

Paterson, Napier Academy: Contact Victoria Vargas  at 973-321-1000 Ext. 20406

Thank you!  And we look forward to working together to make all students healthy and successful this year.

**Please visit the NJ Family Care website to apply for insurance if you lack coverage to see if you qualify. Should you have any questions regarding NJ Family Care application process to enroll your child(ren), please contact the Treatment Coordinators at your school sites by clicking on the “Contact Us” from the menu above.

 

 

Advertisements

beach blue car combi

Photo by Nubia Navarro (nubikini) on Pexels.com

 

Dear Parents/Guardians,

It has been our sincere pleasure to work with your family in providing Health Care Services this school year. We overwhelming appreciate your confidence and warmly recognize your support as we strive to make sure that each and every student  has the brightest future and utmost success. Best wishes for an enjoyable, safe summer from the…

Behavioral Health Team!

IMG_3531

Treatment Coordinators!

FullSizeRender (10)


Lunch Time Cafe’

pexels-photo-274558.jpeg

 

Dear Parents/Guardians,

The Health Center at your child’s Community School (Napier Academy and Senator Frank Lautenberg) is proud to present the ‘Lunchtime Café’ through our Nutrition Services. This program which will run through May is an opportunity for your child to interactively learn about different nutritional needs through discussions and hands on activities like easy recipe making. We believe it will give your children knowledge about nutrition in ways that can keep them healthy and informed at a young age. This is a crucial time for growth and development and by having the right education about nutrition, children can make healthier choices on their own.

Contact the Health Center today!


March 2nd is Dr. Seuss’ birthday !!!  To pay tribute to our favorite children’s author, we have a very healthy poem written by the FSCS Health center nutritionist, Denise Hajjar.

hats_off-page0001

Start your Day the Healthy Way

By Denise Hajjar

Would you drive a car with no gas? This is the question I may ask.

                               Blue_car_cartoon

You need to fuel your body and your mind said the Cat in the Hat…that friend of mine.

The Cat in the Hat eats green eggs and ham so why oh

why don’t you eat a clam?

or a snail….or a snake?

 8021

Because that can give us a belly ache for goodness sake!

So what is a nutritious breakfast asked Sam I Am?

A slice of whole wheat toast with a touch of Jam!

Or an egg of course, but please no spam! YucK!

 cartoon-eggs-6

Now for some fruit…like some berries or grapes… or nice yellow banana like feeding the apes!

                                                       cartoon-44564_640

Choose at least 3 from the 5 food groups….even though it may give you the…..Oops!  You can’t say that said Sam I

Am!

Oh never mind that said the Cat in the Hat…

These are my breakfast ideas that will fuel your brain and keep you running like a plane or a train…                        But sometimes I run out the door with no food in my belly…hey how about an apple with some jelly?

Apple-Cartoon

  Well, perhaps an apple but with some peanut butter; a fruit and a protein, there’s nothing better!  The protein will be sure to keep you focused all day and the apple will keep the doctor away!

                                    The End


FSCS HEALTH CENTER

Since February is the month of the Heart….our Hearts… I thought it appropriate to share with you this beautifully written excerpt from “Staying Healthy with Nutrition” by E. M. Haas, M. D. Enjoy!                                               Denise Hajjar            

            cool-cute-hand-hands-heart-Favim.com-220925 (1)

Vitamin L (the love vitamin) is commonly known as the “universal” or the “love” vitamin, as coined by humanologist, Bethany ArgIsle. One of the most important nutrients for optimum health is a daily dose (or more) of Love. The vital human emotion/expression/experience is necessary for the optimal functioning of people and all of their cells, tissues, and organs. It is found in most of nature – in foods, domestic animals, friends, and family – and is used to heal a wide variety of diseases. There are no toxic effects, but deficiency can cause a wide range of ailments.

Sources: As stated, vitamin L is found in a great variety of sources but must be developed and nurtured to be available. Fear, anger, worry, self-concern, and many other human emotions can destroy vitamin L. It is found readily in most mums and dads and is very highly concentrated in grandmothers and grandpas. Sisters and brothers may be a good source of vitamin L, though often this is covered up in early years, develops in the teens, and is more available in adulthood. Massage therapy is a particularly good source of vitamin L.

Vitamin L is also found in cats, dogs, and horses; in flowers and birds; and in trees and plants. In food, it is especially found in home-cooked or other meals where vitamin L is used consciously as an ingredient. It is digested and absorbed easily and used by the body in its pure state, being eliminated almost unchanged; in this, it is unique among the vitamins. It is also made by friendly bacteria and all positive reactions and attitudes in the body.

Functions: This vitamin acts as the “universal” vitalizing energy. Vitamin L helps to catalyze all human functions and is particularly important to heart function and the circulation of warmth and joy. Digestion is very dependent on appropriate doses of Vitamin L, as is the function of the nervous system. Adrenalin, the brain endorphins (natural tranquilizers and energizers) and other hormones are enhanced by Vitamin L as well. A wide variety of other bodily and life functions are dependent on vitamin L, and it is extremely important to the healing process.

Deficiency and toxicity: There are rarely any serious problems from excess intake of vitamin L. Side effects, however, may include swooning, a strange feeling in the center of the chest, goosebumps, and staring blankly into space.

We will be hosting Heart Healthy workshops in February to help educate about the importance of preventive care.  See our calendar for times at your school. Simply click the dates on the calendar to view events as well as  clinical services!

Screen Shot 2018-02-09 at 1.06.06 PM

 


FSCS HEALTH CENTERThe connection between mind and body is extremely powerful.  At our FSCS Health Centers, we often speak about the power that we all to take control of our eating habits in order to create a healthy life.  When we incorporate certain principles and habits into our daily lives it becomes possible to take control of our mental health.  It is possible, to gain control over our moods as well as reduce stress and anxiety by simply altering our diet.

Our wonderful interns at the health center, Mia Funcheon, and Diana Remache, have created an interesting document that guides you through the mind, body connection and explains practical ways to incorporate good habits into your life today.  To access Diana’s guide, please click on the image below.

Screen Shot 2018-02-02 at 9.14.43 AM

Healthy Minds and Nutrition


FSCS HEALTH CENTER

November is National American Diabetes Awareness Month.  It is a topic that we hold dear to our hearts here at the Health Center.  What is diabetes, you may ask?  There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2.  Type 1 Diabetes is when the body can no longer make any insulin. Insulin is a hormone your body needs to use glucose. Glucose is a sugar your body uses to give you energy. This is why people with type 1 diabetes need to inject insulin every day in order to live. Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented.  Type 2 Diabetes is when the body can make insulin; however, it may not make enough, the insulin may not work well, or both.  Type 2 diabetes may be prevented or delayed for many years.

Every year we see more and more of our students being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.  Type 2 diabetes is caused by unhealthy diet and being overweight.  It is a disease that is preventable with proper diet and exercise and we strive to make nutrition education a priority for the families at our schools.  If you are part of the health clinic and are interested in receiving guidance and support, we are here for you to help with meal planning, counseling, and much more.  Simply contact the treatment coordinator at your school’s health center.

You can find additional information and advice on the Diabetes Awareness website: www.diabetes.org.  Here we have included some important information to review if you feel that you or a family member may be at risk.

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes in Children

Children and teens may be able to prevent diabetes or delay its onset for many years. Small changes can make a big difference. Even a small amount of weight loss can help prevent or delay diabetes.

Losing weight is hard, especially if you’re trying to do it by yourself. Get the whole family involved. After all, a healthy diet for preventing diabetes is a healthy diet for everyone.

Lose Weight By Eating Healthy

Here are some healthy eating tips the whole family can try.

Drink water — Limit sugar-sweetened drinks including, sodas, juices, sports drinks, and coffee drinks. These drinks add calories with little or no nutritional value.

Eat more fruits and vegetables — If fresh is not available, try frozen or canned fruits (in natural juice, not syrup) and vegetables. They’re more affordable, easy to cook and they don’t go bad!

Make healthy snack foods easy to find in the kitchen — Place grapes, carrots or plain popcorn on the counter.

Limit fast food — When you do choose fast food, make healthier choices:

  • Choose salads with dressing on the side
  • Choose foods that are grilled or broiled
  • Choose diet sodas or low-fat milk to drink
  • Hold the mayo
  • Choose baked chips or apple slices instead of French fries.
  • Order the kid-size meal

Learn how to Create Your Plate — Fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables. For the remaining side, fill half with a lean protein, and the remaining quarter with carbs or starches, like brown rice or whole grain pasta.

Lose Weight By Getting Active

Limit sitting in front of a screen time to no more than 2 hours a day — This includes TV, computer, phone and video games.

Get moving — Children and teens should get 60 minutes a day of exercise most days of the week. Here are ways your family can be more physically active:

  • Walk, bike, or scooter to school. Try a “walking school bus” or supervised bike rides.
  • Turn up the music and dance
  • Walk outside, in a mall, at a park, or in a museum
  • Join your local YMCA
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator
  • Get off the bus a stop early and walk
  • Park at the far end of the lot
  • Play interactive video games that get you up and moving
  • Walk around while talking on the phone or watching TV

Set Goals — Challenge your child, and yourself by setting small goals. Reward your successes with non-food items. (Ex. Having a sleepover, renting a movie, going shopping)

Get more tips on setting goalshealthy eating and staying active.

Warning Signs

Children and teens with type 2 diabetes often feel no symptoms at all. However, be aware of some common symptoms of type 2 diabetes.

Increased thirst

Frequent or nighttime urination

Blurry vision

Unusual fatigue

If you notice any of these symptoms in your child, contact a healthcare provider.

To learn more, call us at 1-800-DIABETES (342-2383) or email AskADA@diabetes.org.