Pediatric Health Centers

Tag Archives: Education

March 2nd is Dr. Seuss’ birthday !!!  To pay tribute to our favorite children’s author, we have a very healthy poem written by the FSCS Health center nutritionist, Denise Hajjar.

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Start your Day the Healthy Way

By Denise Hajjar

Would you drive a car with no gas? This is the question I may ask.

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You need to fuel your body and your mind said the Cat in the Hat…that friend of mine.

The Cat in the Hat eats green eggs and ham so why oh

why don’t you eat a clam?

or a snail….or a snake?

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Because that can give us a belly ache for goodness sake!

So what is a nutritious breakfast asked Sam I Am?

A slice of whole wheat toast with a touch of Jam!

Or an egg of course, but please no spam! YucK!

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Now for some fruit…like some berries or grapes… or nice yellow banana like feeding the apes!

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Choose at least 3 from the 5 food groups….even though it may give you the…..Oops!  You can’t say that said Sam I

Am!

Oh never mind that said the Cat in the Hat…

These are my breakfast ideas that will fuel your brain and keep you running like a plane or a train…                        But sometimes I run out the door with no food in my belly…hey how about an apple with some jelly?

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  Well, perhaps an apple but with some peanut butter; a fruit and a protein, there’s nothing better!  The protein will be sure to keep you focused all day and the apple will keep the doctor away!

                                    The End

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FSCS HEALTH CENTERThe connection between mind and body is extremely powerful.  At our FSCS Health Centers, we often speak about the power that we all to take control of our eating habits in order to create a healthy life.  When we incorporate certain principles and habits into our daily lives it becomes possible to take control of our mental health.  It is possible, to gain control over our moods as well as reduce stress and anxiety by simply altering our diet.

Our wonderful interns at the health center, Mia Funcheon, and Diana Remache, have created an interesting document that guides you through the mind, body connection and explains practical ways to incorporate good habits into your life today.  To access Diana’s guide, please click on the image below.

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Healthy Minds and Nutrition


Smelly Feet

Image Source: Personal.PSU.edu

Ever wonder why feet are so stinky?  We wanted to share this very interesting and helpful article first posted on kidshealth.org.  We hope you enjoy it and would love to know your comments.

Un Salud,

The Health Clinic Team

 

Why Do Feet Stink?

They’re your tootsies, your dogs, your piggies. Whatever you call them, feet are an important part of you. Without them, you couldn’t stand up, walk around, or run a race. In fact, your feet work so hard for you that sometimes they get sweaty. And stinky.

Think of a hot, summer day when you’ve been walking around an amusement park all afternoon. Oooh, boy — your feet have been in those sneakers a long time! On the car ride home, you decide to kick off your shoes. It feels good, but it smells bad. In fact, you might get an earful from the other passengers in the car: P.U. — what stinks?

Bacteria are to blame. These tiny critters normally inhabit your feet and love dark, damp places like the insides of sweaty shoes. They multiply in sweat, so if you don’t wear socks, that really gets them going.

In the right conditions, bacteria will feast on your feet. These bacteria eat dead skin cells and oils from your skin. Their colonies will grow and start getting rid of waste in the form of organic acids. It’s those organic acids that smell bad.

And for 10% to 15% of people, the smell is really bad. Why? Because their feet are extra sweaty and become home to bacteria called Kyetococcus sedentarius (say: kite-oh-KAH-kus SEH-den-tair-ee-us). These bacteria produce more than just stinky organic acids — they also produce stuff called volatile sulfur compounds. Sulfur compounds usually are powerful and awful smelling. If you’ve ever smelled a rotten egg, you know what volatile sulfur compounds smell like.

What Can You Do?

There’s usually no need to worry about stinky feet. But if the stink bothers you or someone notices it, you may want help to step in.

So how can you stop your feet from stinking? Well, you might not be able to stop stink completely. But if you cut down on sweat, you’ll cut down on the odor.

Try these steps:

  • Be clean. Wash your feet every day. Dipping your feet into a tub of water and scrubbing may be better than just letting the shower water splash on them. Be sure to dry your feet when you’re done.
  • Wear the right socks. Cotton, some wools, and special knits made for athletes will absorb sweat and allow your feet to breathe. Put on a fresh pair every day, and also if the socks get damp.
  • Make sure your shoes aren’t too tight. If they are, your feet might sweat more than normal.
  • Switch shoes. Wearing the same shoes every day can make them smellier. Let them dry out for a couple of days before wearing them again.
  • Kill those germs. Ask your mom or dad about using a disinfectant spray to kill bacteria in your shoes. You also might wash your feet with antibacterial soap. Setting shoes out in the sun also may help.
  • Wash shoes or insoles. Some insoles or shoes, especially sneakers, may be washable — a great way to kill odors and get clean-smelling shoes again. Be sure to dry them completely before wearing them.
  • Avoid shoes made of plastic. Plastic and some human-made materials don’t let your feet breathe.
  • Go barefoot. Let your feet air out by letting them spend some time in the open air, especially at night. But don’t go barefoot too much — especially in the outdoors — because that can invite certain bacteria (like that Kyetococcus) to live on your feet!
  • Don’t share shoes or towels with others. If you do, that may transfer stink-causing bacteria from other people’s feet to yours. Gross!

If you still have problems with foot odor, talk with your mom or dad to get their opinion. If they agree think the stink is a concern, they can try getting you odor-fighting powder or insoles. If nothing seems to work, you might want to talk with your doctor about what to do. The doctor may give you a special medicine to put on your feet.

For most people, foot odor can be controlled. The worst part about having stinky feet is that it’s embarrassing. If you’re worried about this, just keep your shoes on when you’re in social situations, like when you’re at school or riding in a car.

At home, keep your feet clean and go barefoot so they get some air. If your feet are clean and dry, those bacteria will have to find their lunch somewhere else!

Reviewed by: George Preti, PhD
Date reviewed: October 2014

Source: http://kidshealth.org/kid/talk/yucky/feet_stink.html#


By 

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Spring time is now here. For most children, this means more outdoor activities (swimming, camping, bike riding, etc.). For all parents, this means being extra vigilant to keep your child safe and healthy.

  • Avoiding and Treating Spring Allergies, which can cause your child to have a lot of sneezing, plus a clear runny or stuffy nose, itchy and watery eyes and a cough, especially when he has spent a lot of time outside.Allergic rhinitis, or hay fever, is a common problem in infants and children. The most common symptoms include a stuffy or runny nose with clear drainage, sneezing, itchy eyes and nose, sore throat, throat clearing and a cough that may be worse at night and in the morning. These symptoms usually occur during certain times of the year for people with seasonal allergies, corresponding to being exposed to outdoor allergens, such as tree pollens, grasses and weeds. Other people may have perennial allergies, with problems occurring year round from exposure to indoor allergens, such as dust mites, pets, second hand smoke and molds.Other signs of having allergic rhinitis include the ‘allergic salute,’ a common habit of children which consists of rubbing their nose upward. This is usually because the nose is itchy and this practice can lead to a small crease in the skin of the lower part of the nose. Children with allergic rhinitis also commonly have ‘allergic shiners,’ which are dark circles under the eyes caused by nasal congestion.Allergic rhinitis does run in certain families and are more common in children that have asthma or eczema. It is also more common in children that are exposed to second hand smoke, air pollution and pets.Having uncontrolled allergies can put your child at risk for getting a secondary sinus infection, ear infections, and for having poor concentration at school. It can also make asthma symptoms worse.

    The best treatment for allergic rhinitis is to avoid what your child is allergic to by following prevention and environmental controls. For seasonal allergies, this includes keeping windows closed in the car and at home to avoid exposure to pollens and limit outdoor activities when pollen counts are highest (early morning for tree pollen in the spring, afternoon and early evening for grasses in the summer, and midday for ragweed in the fall).

    The medications that are used to control the symptoms of allergic rhinitis include decongestants, antihistamines and steroids. If symptoms are mild, you can use over the counter medications as needed. Avoid using topical decongestants (such as Afrin) for more than 3-5 days at a time or frequent use of over the counter allergy medicines with antihistamines, as they can cause drowsiness and poor performance in school.

    Prescription allergy medications include the newer, non-sedating antihistamines, such as Claritin and Zyrtec (usual dose is 1-2 teaspoons or 1 pill once a day), and topical steroids, such as Nasonex, Flonase, and Nasacort Aqua (usual dose is 1-2 squirts in each nostril once each day). If your child’s symptoms are well controlled, then you can decrease the dose of the nasal steroid that you are using for 1-2 weeks and then consider trying your child off of it and see how they do. Continue the antihistamine for 1-2 months or until your child’s allergy season is over. Allegra is another antihistamine that is commonly used in older children because it is only available in a pill form.

    To be effective, your child should be using these medications every day. They will not work as well if just used on an as needed basis. They are in general very safe with few side effects, but the nasal steroids have been associated with growth suppression when used in high doses. This is however rare, and your pediatrician will monitor your child’s growth to make sure this does not happen.

    If your child’s symptoms are not improving with the combination of the antihistamine and steroid, then we may also use a decongestant, such as Sudafed, AH-CHEW D, or as a combination (Claritin D).

    For seasonal allergies, it is best to start using these medications just before your child’s season begins and then continue the medicines every day all through the season. For perennial allergies, your child may need to take these medicines year round.

    Your child may also benefit from nasal irrigations using saline nose drops 1-3 times a day. This will help the sinuses drain.

    If your child does not improve with these interventions, then we will consider having him see an allergy specialist for skin testing to figure out what he is allergic to and to possibly start immunotherapy injections (allergy shots).

    See the guide to Allergies and Children for more information.


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Welcome to 2014! Come and learn about new changes to NJ Family Cares policies and procedures at the FSCS Health Center.

NRC School

Date: Thursday, January 23rd

Time: 9:00am & 5:00pm

Location: NRC Health Center, Room 1A 120

For more information: (973) 321-1000 x22489, NRC@outreachhealth.org

School 5

Date: Thursday, January 29th
Time: 9:00am
Location: School 5 Health Center, Room 100B

For more information, contact: Masuma Begum (973) 321-2273, School5@outreachhealth.org

School 4

Date: Friday, January 30th

Time: 9:00am

Location: School 4 Health Center, Room 105

For more information, contact: Kelly Domingues 973-321-1000 x20406, School4@outreachhealth.org